Garden and plants

Gardening after the virus 1

I’ve been sick. The covid-19 hit hard, but I refuse to let it fill an entire blog post, media is full of covid-19 content, so I’ll just stick to the plan I had with this blog and focus on the frugality – adding a prepper-like shine to it.

I wanted to have loads of flowers, and though I still do, I must admit, that Ive changed my perspective about it a bit. With the world going into a new depression after the virus and the different farm crisises all over the world, I’m worried about the food situation. Two months ago I grew food for fun, now it’s a matter of living and living well in a few months.

I wanted to focus on lettuce and spinach and other fast crops, but now I’ve exchanged seeds and I’m growing more beets, chard, beans of all sorts, more peas than planned, carrots, pumpkins, kale etc. I wanted to have rabbits for eating, but B said NO and didn’t seem interested in discussing the matter.

I’ve built a greenhouse from old plastic bags and twigs, and so far I only need it to stay whole for a month or so, and then the weather should be good enough.

Yup. It is ugly, but the fleece and the plastic (cut from the bottom of an old kids swimming pool) is there to protect from the cold during the night. It works SO well.

That’s it for now. More will come. Right now I need to go dig another bed and take away the grass and roots. It’s hard work, but I love the rewarding feeling I get when I see a new seed sprout and promise me a bit of food in the future.

Compost-pile chapter 1

Compost pile

So – this is the beginning of my first compost pile. I´ve never done one before (surprise – I´ve never had a carden either), so I decided I didn´t want to spend money on materials or anything fancy, if it turns out it´s a waste of time. Let it be said, that my garden is…if not tiny, then small-ish. So if it´s even possible to get a proper use of it, I don´t know. But I did think about it, and when I walked the dog this morning,

I went to the near by park and picked up some branches from the ground, and took them home. I put them in the ground, and then took some of the vines I cut off my grapevine a few weeks ago, and put them in between them as a kind of basket weave. In the bottom I put some twigs to make sure there´ll be some sort of ventilation, and dropped a bouquet of tulips I got from a friend and……yup. That was it.

I like the look of it, and how it actually “fits” the garden and our “style” and doesn´t look posh – but pretty “organic” (because it is).

I can´t wait until the hedge is bigger and we´ll get some privacy. It´s only about a year old and really scrawny…

Sowing Allium ursinum

Just before Christmas we went to the garden center just for fun, and they had all sorts of seeds on sale, and we got a whole bunch of different stuff including different varieties of Tulips and Daffodils that I planted about 1 week ago. A bit too late, but I wanted to make sure they didn’t come too early as we’ve had almost no frost this winter (yet). I put my garlic in the ground in December as the almanac says, but… I’m a but worried that them already being 15 cm tall will be a problem if winter comes. So I planted a new batch just to be sure – as I use quite a lot of garlic.

But! Along the seeds I got some allium ursinum (in Denmark we call them ramsløg). And they need to get in the ground in january.

So. Here they are. I’m experimenting a bit, because I didn’t find any ressources about what kind if soil they need, so I have one half with just dirt from the garden (since my other alliums are sprouting just fine) and the other half has some bought compost on top. I’m using a plastic egg tray, which was saved. I know people prefer the paper ones, but…the eggs were cheaper in plastic and I want to use the tray later and next year as well, as it’s creating as little greenhouse with its lid on… so that’s my justification right now.

I’m not watering the soil, but spraying it, keeping it a bit moist and not wet, since it’s not going to evaporate from the outside like a paper tray. I read somewhere that they need the cold, so I put it outside a few days before bringing it inside placing it in the window. And now… I’m waiting. Juuust like with everything else that happens in the garden.

Lemon tree growing. Chapter 1. (Day 1-8)

I got my hands on some organic lemons the other day, and decided to try if it would be possible to grow a tree, and possibly have one ready for my parents 40 year wedding day next year. I live in Denmark, so it’s a gamble, due to the weather and the cold season, but either way, I will learn from the experience. It won’t be very likely that it will ever produce any fruits, but I actually think they’re pretty trees and the leaves themselves have a wonderful smell, and I think I can use them for something regardless.

Step 1 and 2

Step 1. Is getting the seeds out. I know people usually cut the lemon in half, but “being frugal” I didn’t want to waste any seeds. Instead of cutting the lemon all the way through, I decided to just cut a bit and using my fingers to separate it and dig out the seeds.

Step 2. Peel off the outer shell. I see most people use paper cloth to hold the seeds (they’re slippery as F), while peeling off the hard shell. I decided to use a kitchen towel instead, because I felt it was easier to rub of the slimy stuff. And I was right. It was SO easy!

Step 3.

Step 3. I put the (8) kernels on some paper towel (ok…toilet paper) and drizzled some water on it before putting it in a plastic bag. Most people use ziplock bags, but I want to reuse my plastic as much as possible, so I just closed it with a locking mechanism I got from IKEA years ago.

Step 4. Remember to date it and write what’s in the bag.

Step 4. Leave it a warm place for at least 1 week. We have a quite cold house, so I put it next to my radiators, but to make sure, that it didn’t burn I wrapped it in a duvet.

Step 5… set your alarm/calendar and wait…just like me. Chapter 2 will come within a few weeks.